Hhd 56 Egg Incubator User Manual

Incubators

  1. Hhd Egg Incubator User Manual
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  4. Hhd 56 Egg Incubator User Manual Instructions

If you are still active user then please click 'NO' Yes. Brinsea Ovation 56 Eco Egg Incubator. Brinsea Maxi II Eco Manual Egg Incubator.

These units are are designed to cater for a monthly production from 32 to 360 eggs per month.

Click on the model below to read more on the specific model
KBD-88 KBD-32 KBD-48 KBD-56 KBD-112 KBD-360

KBD-88

The KBD-88 is a perfect machine for beginners. This machine is lightweight and very easy to use. The KBD-88 can be used both as a setter (with the user turning the eggs twice per day) or as a hatcher, allowing a warm and automatically regulated temperature to help your eggs hatch in the last 3 days of incubation.

The KBD-88 can incubate a wide variety of eggs including chicken, quail, birds, emu, goose, reptile and turkey .

Setting Capacity:
– Up to 88 eggs (dependant on breed )

Hatching Capacity:
– Up to 88 eggs (dependant on breed )

Product Description:

The KBD-88 has the following features:

  • Fully Digital and automated Temperature Control
  • Digital display showing Temperature that can easily be adjusted by a click of a button
  • Light weight build
  • Incubator made of Ultra Durable ABS Plastic with polystyrene base
  • Opti-Flow™ Specialized High Volume Incubator Fan
  • Maxi-Heat™ Energy Saving Incubator Heating System
  • Removable base to allow for easy cleaning
  • Power Usage: 220V Single Phase, 80 Watt

R 1295-00

KBD-88 KBD-32 KBD-48 KBD-56 KBD-112 KBD-360

KBD-32

Have you always wanted to experience a few eggs hatching but your backyard hen refuses to sit on her eggs? WE KNOW THE FEELING!That’s why KBD HATCHERY has introduced the KBD-32 fully automatic egg incubator. This machine automatically regulates the temperature, while also keeping track of the humidity levels inside the machine and how many days you have had the eggs inside the machine.

Setting Capacity:
– Chicken -32 eggs
– Quail – 32 eggs
– Guinea fowl – 32 eggs

Hatching Capacity:
– Chicken -32 eggs
– Quail – 32 eggs
– Guinea fowl – 32 eggs

The KBD-32 is a 2 in 1 machine, acting as both a setter and a hatcher. It also has a clear lid to make it easy to observe the chicks cracking through their shell.

Product Description:
The KBD- 32 has the following features:

  • Fully Digital and automated Temperature Control
  • Digital display showing Temperature, Humidity, turner timer and a day counter
  • Automatic Egg Turning every 2 hours
  • Clear Observation Lid covering the entire top of the egg incubator for easy viewing of chicks hatching
  • Incubator made of Ultra Durable ABS Plastic
  • Opti-Flow™ Specialized High Volume Incubator Fan
  • Maxi-Heat™ Energy Saving Incubator Heating System
  • Medical Grade Anti-Bacterial inner coating to ensure a clean environment for the best hatch rates
  • Power Usage: 220V Single Phase, 60Watt

R 2150-00

KBD-88 KBD-32 KBD-48 KBD-56 KBD-112 KBD-360

KBD-48

Are you constantly battling with power outages? KBD HATCHERY has got the ideal egg incubator to help keep your hatchery powered.

The NEW and IMPROVED KBD-48 now has 12v capability and can easily connect to a battery, such as a car battery, to keep you powered for many hours.

Setting Capacity:
– Chicken – 48 eggs
– Quail – 48 eggs
– Guinea fowl – 48 eggs

Hatching Capacity:
– Chicken – 48 eggs
– Quail – 48 eggs
– Guinea fowl – 48 eggs

This dual power incubator also includes fully automatic egg turning every 2 hours with a full digital temperature and humidity display, also showing useful information such as a day counter and egg turner countdown, to make sure you can keep track of all the automated functions. It is incredibly easy to use and requires no special skills. You can load a maximum of 48 eggs per batch.

The introduction of the dual power egg incubator has benefitted the lives of many rural farmers. (Battery NOT included )

Product Description:
The KBD-48 has the following features:

  • Fully Digital and automated Temperature Control
  • Dual power 12v or standard house-hold 220v
  • Digital display showing Temperature, Humidity, turner timer and a day counter
  • Automatic Egg Turning every 2 hours
  • Egg trays suitable for chickens, quails or guinea fowl
  • Clear Observation Lid covering the entire top of the egg incubator for easy viewing of chicks hatching
  • Incubator made of Ultra Durable ABS Plastic
  • Opti-Flow™ Specialized High Volume Incubator Fan
  • Maxi-Heat™ Energy Saving Incubator Heating System
  • Medical Grade Anti-Bacterial inner coating to ensure a clean environment for the best hatch rates
  • Power Usage:12V OR 220V Single Phase, 80 Watt

R 2600-00

KBD-88 KBD-32 KBD-48 KBD-56 KBD-112 KBD-360

KBD-56

The KBD-56 is one of our smaller fully automatic digital egg incubators, which is very user friendly and easy to operate. You can load up to a maximum of 56 eggs at a time, making it the perfect incubator for small scale hobby use.

Setting Capacity:
– Chicken – 56 eggs
– Quail – 56 eggs
– Guinea fowl – 56 eggs

Hatching Capacity:
– Chicken – 56 eggs
– Quail – 56 eggs
– Guinea fowl – 56 eggs

This egg incubator will suit the needs of someone who wants to incubate eggs on a smaller scale. It is easy to use, fully-automatic and requires no additional skills to use. Temperature is automatically regulated by the digital heat controller. It’s the ideal incubator to start with!

Product Description:

The KBD-56 has the following features:

  • Fully Digital and automated Temperature Control
  • Digital display showing Temperature, Humidity, turner timer and a day counter
  • Automatic Egg Turning every 2 hours
  • Egg trays suitable for chickens, quails or guinea fowl
  • Clear Observation Lid covering the entire top of the egg incubator for easy viewing of chicks hatching
  • Incubator made of Ultra Durable ABS Plastic
  • Opti-Flow™ Specialized High Volume Incubator Fan
  • Maxi-Heat™ Energy Saving Incubator Heating System
  • Medical Grade Anti-Bacterial inner coating to ensure a clean environment for the best hatch rates
  • Power Usage: 220V Single Phase, 80 Watt

R 3000-00

KBD-88 KBD-32 KBD-48 KBD-56 KBD-112 KBD-360

KBD-112

Are you constantly battling with power outages? KBD HATCHERY has got the ideal egg incubator to help keep your hatchery powered.

The NEW and IMPROVED KBD-112 now has 12v capability and can easily connect to a battery, such as a car battery, to keep you powered for many hours .

Setting Capacity:
– Chicken – 112 eggs
– Quail – 112 eggs
– Guinea fowl – 112 eggs

Hatching Capacity:
– Chicken – 112 eggs
– Quail – 112 eggs
– Guinea fowl – 112 eggs

This dual power incubator also includes fully automatic egg turning every 2 hours with a full digital temperature and humidity displays, also showing useful information such as a day counter and egg turner countdown, to make sure you can keep track of all the automated functions. It’s incredibly easy to use and requires no special skills. You can load a maximum of 112 eggs per batch.

The introduction of the dual power egg incubator has benefitted the lives of many rural farmers. (Battery NOT included )

Product Description:
The KBD- 112 has the following features:

  • Fully Digital and automated Temperature Control
  • Dual power 12v or standard house hold 220v
  • Digital display showing Temperature, Humidity ,turner timer and a day counter
  • Automatic Egg Turning every 2 hours
  • Egg trays suitable for chickens, quails or guinea fowl
  • Clear Observation sides covering 360˚ of the egg incubator for easy viewing of chicks hatching
  • Incubator made of Ultra Durable ABS Plastic
  • Opti-Flow™ Specialized High Volume Incubator Fan
  • Maxi-Heat™ Energy Saving Incubator Heating System
  • Medical Grade Anti-Bacterial inner coating to ensure a clean environment for the best hatch rates
  • Power Usage:12V OR 220V Single Phase, 100 Watt

R 3900-00

KBD-88 KBD-32 KBD-48 KBD-56 KBD-112 KBD-360

KBD-360

The KBD-360 is one of our larger fully automatic digital egg incubators, which is very user friendly and easy to operate. You can load up to a maximum of 360 eggs at a time, making it the perfect incubator for small to medium scale hobby use. The advantage the KBD-360 has is that this is a machine that grows with your business. You can now easily add extra egg turner trays to this machine increasing the egg capacity up to 1320 eggs. This can be done by purchasing a KBD-120 ADD ON. This now connects onto the machine increasing the capacity 120 eggs at a time.

Setting Capacity:
– Chicken – 360 eggs on base model (but up to 1320 egg once all KBD-120 ADD ON units have been purchased)
– Quail – 360 eggs on base model (but up to 1320 egg once all KBD-120 ADD ON units have been purchased)
– Guinea fowl – 360 eggs on base model (but up to 1320 egg once all KBD-120 ADD ON units have been purchased)

Hatching Capacity:
– Chicken – 360 eggs on base model (but up to 1320 egg once all KBD-120 ADD ON units have been purchased)
– Quail – 360 eggs on base model (but up to 1320 egg once all KBD-120 ADD ON units have been purchased)
– Guinea fowl – 360 eggs on base model (but up to 1320 egg once all KBD-120 ADD ON units have been purchased)

This egg incubator will suit the needs of someone who wants to incubate eggs on a smaller-medium scale but has plans to expand their operation in the near future. It is easy to use, fully-automatic and requires no additional skills to use. Temperature is automatically regulated by the digital heat controller. It’s the ideal incubator to start with!

Product Description:

The KBD-360 has the following features:

  • Fully Digital and automated Temperature Control
  • Digital display showing Temperature, Humidity, turner timer and a day counter
  • Automatic Egg Turning every 2 hours
  • Egg trays suitable for chickens, quails or guinea fowl
  • Incubator made of Ultra Durable ABS Plastic
  • Opti-Flow™ Specialized High Volume Incubator Fan
  • Maxi-Heat™ Energy Saving Incubator Heating System
  • Medical Grade Anti-Bacterial inner coating to ensure a clean environment for the best hatch rates
  • Power Usage: 220V Single Phase, 320 Watt

Base Unit – R 6100-00
(KBD-120 add on tray) – R 1195-00

KBD-88 KBD-32 KBD-48 KBD-56 KBD-112 KBD-360

Getting good results from a hatch will depend on the correct operation of your incubator. You should of course be familiar with your incubator manufacturer’s instructions before you make a start but there are a number of pitfalls to watch out for and subtle differences between different incubators. There are two basic types of incubators ‘still air’ and ‘forced air’ (contains a fan) and these need to be set up in a slightly different way.

Still air incubators

As there is no fan to ‘mix up’ the air, ‘stratification’ of air takes place – in other words, the temperature increases with height. (Remember those science lessons where you were told that hot air rises?) My ‘Brinsea Polyhatch’ incubator recommends 39.2° at the TOP of the eggs for hens eggs – this should be the correct incubation temperature for them (in this case 37.5°) at the centre of the egg.

Remember when making adjustments not to remove the lid or you will mess up the layers of air and be taking the wrong readings.

Forced air incubators

Forced-air incubators use fans inside the incubator to provide air circulation around the eggs.

This ‘mixes’ up the warm air, providing an even air temperature throughout (or at least in an ideal World, in reality, there can be slight differences).

The temperature in forced-air incubators should be set to the exact incubation temperature that the eggs require (e.g. 37.5°C for chicken eggs) and can be measured anywhere inside the incubator within the air flow.

Incubator

The correct incubation temperature

Recommended temperatures vary between the two types of incubators, so do follow the manufacturer’s recommendations. Next, you should check the accuracy of your thermometer. The accuracy of some thermometers can be a little difficult to check.

I have 3 identical glass bulb thermometers and each reads slightly differently which in turn reads slightly different to the electronic thermometer!

Whilst the resolution on many digital thermometers is good (usually 0.1 degrees) the accuracy is often only ±5% on cheap units. Check the accuracy before you buy. 5% in 37 degrees is a potential error of nearly ±2 degrees!

Most incubator manufacturers state in their instructions that the only sure way to set the temperature accurately is based on a successful hatch so if your eggs are hatching late, increase the temperature slightly and if they are hatching early then decrease the temperature slightly.

I tend to check my thermometers in a glass of warm water, making sure they are not too far apart, then, I check the incubator against ‘known good’ thermometers that agree with one another.

Incubator temperature fluctuations

Try to locate the incubator away from sources of heat and draughts, and limit temperature fluctuations in the room. Ensure that your incubator is operating at the correct room temperature – most incubators don’t work outside of normal room temperatures so you will usually have to find a room in the house that doesn’t change in temperature too much.

Ideally, turn the radiator off if your heating is on as not only does the heating cause large fluctuations in temperature but also dries the air considerably that will alter the humidity.

The correct humidity and ventilation

This is very important and most of the failed hatches are due to the humidity not being set correctly. Most incubators have a small container in which to add water to and this needs topping up usually every second or third day.

Ventilation is equally important since the shells are porous and need to breathe. Most incubators control the humidity by increasing or decreasing the ventilation that in turn increases and decreases the amount of air change in the incubator.

Remember the humidity of the air outside of the incubator varies considerably from week to week so it is important to monitor the humidity (inside the incubator) regularly. Modern ‘all singing, all dancing’ incubators have an automatic humidity control which will accurately control the humidity (usually via a pump and humidity measurement system controlled by a microprocessor).

There are a few different methods for checking humidity but the most reliable (and value for money) we have found is the wet bulb thermometer (again, just make sure both thermometers read the same temperature to start with).

During incubation, keep an eye on the development of the air sack – which should be seen when candling your eggs at the broad end of the shell and should occupy between a quarter to a third of the egg by the time the youngster hatches.

The Indian Runner Duck egg shown to the right has been candled at 7 days old and the air-sack (light area at the top of the egg) as well as the developing embryo (middle) can clearly be seen.

The humidity should be raised during the last few days of incubation according to the recommendations for the breed. This is normally achieved by adding water to a second reservoir although getting the humidity high enough can sometimes be difficult to achieve.

I sometimes add some sheets of kitchen roll folded into a long strip, dangle one end into the water reservoir and let the other hang out. This acts like a wick and provides more surface area for the water to evaporate from and helps me to get the humidity high enough.

There is further guidance on the correct incubation humidity here.

Adding eggs to your incubator

Hatching eggs should be clean and nest box hygiene is important. Some people (me included) like to clean their hatching eggs with incubation disinfectant as well.

It is necessary to run the incubator for at least 24 hours before putting your eggs in. This ensures everything has stabilised.

Once you have set your incubator correctly and added your eggs, do not make any further adjustments. Wait 24 hours for let the eggs come up to temperature and stabilise before making any adjustments.

Turning eggs in the incubator

Eggs do need to be turned, mimicking the actions of the mother. Your incubator may do this for you or you may have to move a control manually, or you may not be so lucky and have to turn them yourself. If you do have to turn them yourself then it is wise to put a cross on one side of the eggs in soft pencil so that you know which way up your eggs are. This helps if you forget which ones you have turned.

You should turn your eggs an odd number of times each day so that they are on the opposite side for each ‘long night’. I would recommend a minimum of 3 turns per day. It is a good idea to move the position of your eggs around inside a still air incubator from time to time as you can get slightly different conditions in different parts of the incubator.

This shouldn’t be necessary in a forced air incubator due to the continuous circulation of air. Stop turning the eggs a few days before the hatch (there are different recommendations for different breeds but generally this is 2 or 3 days before the hatch) at the same time as you increase the humidity in the incubator.

Be patient… It is best not to disturb your eggs during the first few days as this is the most delicate stage of their growth. After 6 or 7 days you should be ready to ‘candle’ them.

Hhd Egg Incubator User Manual

Hatch time!

Hhd 24 Egg Incubator Manual

Again, be patient! Your eggs should hatch within 24 hours of one another. The difference in time between them can be caused by the differences in storage time and having slightly different incubation conditions in different parts of the incubator.

PHOTO

It is important not to take the lid off your incubator as you will affect the humidity that has built up inside. The early birds that have hatched should stay inside the incubator as they need to dry out fully for several hours before they are moved to your brooder.

Taking the lid off too early will make it harder for the others to get out of their shells. Chicks do not need to eat or drink during the first 24 hours as they have had a sufficient amount of nutrition from their egg yolk – this is why day old chicks can be shipped around the country.

Once the first few hatchlings have dried out and the hatch is well under way (I often leave mine overnight), you can move them out of your incubator to your brooder. You are now ready to raise them but don’t forget to clean and sterilise your incubator after the hatch before too much of the mess gets dried on!

The video clip above was taken at double normal speed and shows you the last 6 minutes of a hatch (the eggs are Copper Black Marans eggs) using an Rcom King Suro incubator. These have an exceptionally good viewing window as you can see from this film.

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Tim Daniels

Hhd 56 Egg Incubator Manual

Tim is the founder of the poultrykeeper website and lives in Herefordshire, UK. He keeps Cream Legbar chickens, Silver Sebright bantams and hybrid layers for eggs, Abacot Ranger ducks, Brecon Buff geese and some quail.
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Hhd 56 Egg Incubator User Manual Instructions

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